UC Davis Summer Abroad

Announcements

Status: Closed for 2017

Sustainable Ecuador — From the Andes to the Amazon

Quito and the Amazon Basin, Ecuador

Arrive Date: July 1, 2017   End Date: July 29, 2017

Program Overview

This program examines the historical development and current situation of Ecuador’s indigenous peoples, with special emphasis on issues of environmental sustainability. Through lectures, seminar discussions, and fieldwork, the program underscores the impact that economic and political factors have on the process of indigenous cultural adaptation. Students will develop individual research/creative projects and will have the opportunity to interact with indigenous Andean and Amazonian people with whom they will exchange knowledge and share the community lifestyle of different regions of Ecuador and the Amazonian tropical rain forest. The program will focus specially on the Huaorani people in the Yasuni reserve and their complex relation with the government and the private national and international community that are mostly interested in the oil, minerals, and natural resources located in their homeland.

Instructor:  Stefano Varese

Taught in:  English

Max Enrollment:  25

Program CoordinatorKendall Quisenberry

Student Video Project and Info Session Presentation

Student video project, by Brooke E. Gemmell

  
Courses

Native American Studies (NAS) 120. Ethonopolitics of South American Indians (4 units)

Native American Studies (NAS) 198. Directed Group Study (4 units, P/NP)

Graduate Course Options

Native American Studies (NAS) 202. Advance Topics in Native American Studies (4 units)

Native American Studies (NAS) 298. Directed Group Study (4 units, P/NP grading only)

Program Highlights
  • Experience the beauty of this biologically and culturally diverse country of rain forests, rivers, snow covered mountains and volcanoes.
  • Meet indigenous Amazonians and learn about their historical development and current situation.
Similar Programs

Other Programs in Native American Studies

Other Programs in Latin America